Upping Your Coffee Game with the Moka Pot

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Upping Your Coffee Game with the Moka Pot

When you think about it, we live in an incredible time in the progression of history. Born a hundred years ago and we would've missed out on the sport (and lifestyle) we've come to love ... mountain biking. Even on a yearly basis we see technological advancements within mountain biking as well as riders pushing the boundaries of what is deemed as "extreme" farther and father. It's almost comical to see late 80s DH races on grainy video footage ... narrow bars, sketchy brakes, short travel bikes, and wild clothes.

The same applies to coffee. Even though coffee has been around hundred and hundreds of years (some cite its origins of discovery to an Ethiopian goat herder in the 9th century) the way we drink it continues to rapidly change and progress. Even recently we backed a Kickstarter campaign for the new Cafflano Kompressor as well as purchased the Prismo by Fellow just this week. Both are adaptions of ways to drink coffee.

But sometimes we need to go old school for brewing coffee. Like riding a fully rigid steel frame singlespeed mountain bike there's something refreshing about the simplicity of something tried and true.

The moka pot is one such brew method.

With its origins dating back to 1933 the Bialetti moka pot is still used by countless millions around the world. The concept is simple and efficient ... add water into the tank, ground coffee into the basket, put the basket in the water tank, screw the top (collecting chamber) on, and place over a heat source whether a stove top, camp stove, or campfire. Within minutes you'll have a rich and creamy cup of coffee.

Tried and true. Simple. Why not give it a whirl!?!? They are inexpensive and variations can be found anywhere from thrift stores to Ikea to many places online. It's worth a shot. Time to up your coffee game. To see more specifics on this brew method check out the moka pot on our Brew Method page.

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Coffee and Enduro

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Coffee and Enduro

Every organization lives by values or principles whether they are written down on a website or not. Most often they end up being the "unwritten rules" of the company. At Loam Coffee we're no different. We're guided by a set of principles and values (even "unwritten rules") that acts as a filter of sorts for how and where we get involved. Here's what we know (and what you know) ... we're into both coffee and mountain biking. Pretty basic and obvious.

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Mountain Bike Tribes

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Mountain Bike Tribes

To the outside world mountain bikers and are simply mountain bikers. We all look the same, act the same, ride the same bikes, dress the same, wear the same shoes, frequent the same websites, and even talk the same. You know and I know, and I know and you know ... that's utterly not true.

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Local Coffee for the World

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Local Coffee for the World

While "local" is a hot buzzword it can be a bit deceiving. We love our local coffee shops, local restaurants, local bike shops, and so on. But in a truly globalized world the word local is often misleading and misunderstood. What even does local mean?

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The Case for Local Trails

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The Case for Local Trails

Mountain bikers are an interesting lot. We'll drive two vehicles for fours so three people can ride shuttled laps. We don't think much about loading our bikes up and hitting the road for the day. "Close" trips are anything within an hour and "reasonable" trips are anything under three hours one way. Driving and shuttling become almost as important as the ride itself and we have awesome set-ups to prove it ... Dakine truck pads, coolers full of ice for post-ride brews, and then there's the whole #vanlife crew out there with the amazing retrofits.

So when do local trails become local? What does local even mean?

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Travel Pouches for Your Adventures

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Travel Pouches for Your Adventures

It is definitely that time of the year where many of you travel greater distances and embark on epic adventures. As temps consistently warm up (speaking from the PNW point of view) and we shift into summer mode many of you with jobs that keep you close to home Monday through Friday try and eke out travels on weekends, explore greater distances on long weekends, and use hard earned vacation time to push the boundaries even farther.

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